Jessica Hayes, science teacher at Elizabethton High School, is the latest Northeast Community Credit Union Helping Teachers Teach grant winner.

Hayes applied for the grant to help cover the cost for students competing in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Science Bowl. While at the Science Bowl, students will participate in the competition, attend a dinner and meet scientists that work in and around the lab.

“Besides the competition, students will get a learning experience,” Hayes said. “It is an enriching experience.”

Northeast Community Credit Union awards $300 every month to a classroom to be utilized for classroom needs, classroom activities, and academic enrichment.  Helping Teachers Teach is open to teachers within Carter, Johnson, Unicoi, Sullivan and Washington counties who are members of Northeast Community Credit Union. Area teachers may become members online or at any NCCU location and can download the grant application on the credit union’s website:  www.BeMyCU.org.

Northeast Community Credit Union is excited to announce the appointment of David LeVeau as Commercial Loan Manager, spearheading the credit union’s new commercial lending program. Since Mr. LeVeau’s arrival, NCCU has instituted a comprehensive commercial lending initiative to support local businesses with their financing requirements.

Bringing 23 years of financial expertise from the community banking sector and beyond, Mr. LeVeau holds a BS degree in Business Administration from UNC-Chapel Hill, a Masters of Accountancy from ETSU, and graduated from the LSU Graduate School of Banking in 2019. Beyond his professional accomplishments, Mr. LeVeau is actively involved in the community, serving on several non-profit boards and coaching youth sports. Married for nearly 13 years to his wife Anette, Mr. LeVeau enjoys spending quality time with his children and grandchildren.

Teresa Arnold, President/CEO of NCCU, praises LeVeau as “an ideal addition to our credit union,” highlighting his extensive financial background, dedication to family financial well-being, and hands-on involvement in community growth. Arnold emphasizes the growing demand for commercial lending among local small businesses and sees LeVeau’s expertise as instrumental in helping businesses achieve sustained success.

Founded in 1952, NCCU’s assets have reached nearly $180 million, serving close to 13,000 members. Membership is open to individuals and businesses residing, working, worshiping, or attending school in Carter, Johnson, Washington, Unicoi, and Sullivan counties, along with their families. With four branches and digital services, NCCU caters to various member needs.

The new lending program extends commercial real estate loans, business equipment and vehicle loans, and business lines of credit to business members. Mr. LeVeau is dedicated to assisting existing and potential business members in the community. These offerings align with NCCU’s mission of “people helping people,” aiming to enhance local financial well-being and promote economic development.

Businesses in Carter, Johnson, Sullivan, Washington, and Unicoi counties can become NCCU members by depositing a single “share” ($5), granting ownership in the credit union and eligibility for loan products, checking accounts, investments, and more. For additional details on the program or membership, visit www.bemycu.org. NCCU’s commercial loan webpage is accessible at https://www.bemycu.org/loans/loan-types/commercial-loans/. Contact David LeVeau at commerciallending@bemycu.org for inquiries.

 

Courtney Taylor, Response to Intervention (RTI) Coordinator at Hunter Elementary, is the latest Northeast Community Credit Union Helping Teachers Teach grant winner.

Taylor applied for the grant to purchase materials and programs to enhance students’ reading skills – specifically students showing signs of dyslexia and students that speak a language other than English.

“Struggling readers are often very hesitant to participate in reading activities,” Taylor said. “Many of my students are already frustrated with their reading abilities. The resources I have found are used in game-like situations, so students feel like they are playing, even though they are learning at the same time. I would love for them to increase their reading levels while playing fun learning-based games.”

Northeast Community Credit Union awards $300 every month to a classroom to be utilized for classroom needs, classroom activities, and academic enrichment.  Helping Teachers Teach is open to teachers within Carter, Johnson, Unicoi, Sullivan and Washington counties who are members of Northeast Community Credit Union. Area teachers may become members online or at any NCCU location and can download the grant application on the credit union’s website:  www.BeMyCU.org.

 

Northeast Community Credit Union is investing in the children of Carter County with a donation of $1,000 to the Carter County Imagination Library.

Northeast Community Credit Union is a Foundation Member of CCIL and has contributed thousands of dollars since the start of Carter County Imagination Library. Carter County Imagination Library provides a free book to children in Carter County every month from birth until they turn five years old.

“Our Board of Directors has a commitment to our community to annually donate a percentage of proceeds to local organizations for worthy causes,” NCCU President/CEO Teresa Arnold said. “We are so grateful for an opportunity to help provide books to children in our area. Children encounter worlds of adventure and inspiration while experiencing the enjoyment books can bring for a lifetime.”

According to the CCIL, the cost to provide children with books from birth until age 5 is around $150 per child.   Presenting this year’s donation on behalf of NCCU to Carter County Imagination Library is Andrea Lewis, Business Development and Event Coordinator.

To donate to the Imagination Library, contact the Elizabethton/Carter County Public Library at (423) 547-6360.

Northeast Community Credit Union is a major contributor in the local community and has been providing service since October 1952 when it was chartered as a credit union by the State of Tennessee. Northeast Community Credit Union is a not-for-profit financial cooperative focused on youth financial education, providing convenient low-cost financial products and service to help families have richer futures, and growing strong local businesses while serving anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Carter, Johnson, Washington, Unicoi and Sullivan counties along with their family members.

Amy Cole, teacher at Harold McCormick Elementary, is the latest Northeast Community Credit Union Helping Teachers Teach grant winner.

 

Cole applied for the grant to provide Boogie Board tablets for students to use to practice writing. The Boogie Boards will be used in addition to paper and dry erase boards.

 

“The students will have another way to practice letter formation and then later use them to practice writing words and sentences,” Cole said.

 

Northeast Community Credit Union awards $300 every month to a classroom to be utilized for classroom needs, classroom activities, and academic enrichment.  Helping Teachers Teach is open to teachers within Carter, Johnson, Unicoi, Sullivan and Washington counties who are members of Northeast Community Credit Union. Area teachers may become members online or at any NCCU location and can download the grant application on the credit union’s website:  www.BeMyCU.org.

The holidays are here, which means two things: package deliveries are on the rise and scammers are taking advantage.

So if you get an unexpected text message from FedEx, UPS or the Postal Service telling you about an unclaimed package — and a link to claim it — do NOT take the bait.

We’re here to help you spot and avoid those pesky parcel tracking scams.

What is a package delivery scam?
A package delivery scam happens when you get an unsolicited text message about an unclaimed delivery, with a malicious link to supposedly “claim” the package that doesn’t actually exist. The FTC has a reported a spike in these scam texts, which sometimes include a fake tracking number and typically appear to come from a company you already know and trust — like Fedex, UPS, Amazon or the U.S. Postal Service (USPS).

Fake shipping texts can contain messages like this:

  • You have an undelivered package that you can pick up, once you confirm your personal information and card details.
  • You have an undelivered package that won’t ship until you pay an additional fee.
  • You have a chance to win a free gift card or a free item, once you follow a web link, provide personal information, and pay for shipping.

Fake website: How the scam works

With these scams, fraudsters will link to a deceptive website that looks like an official delivery tracking site. They may indicate that a package is waiting at a warehouse, and once you answer a few questions, they’ll release the package (which doesn’t exist). They might even give you a fake tracking number in the text message, and ask you to plug in the number to receive more information.

But ultimately, at some point — usually at the end of the questionnaire — they will ask for personal or payment information. Once you input that, you’ve given the scammer everything they need to steal from you.

How to avoid a fake shipping scam

  • DO ask yourself these questions. Was I expecting a package delivery? Did I send a package to someone? Did I ask for text notifications?
  • DON’T click on any suspicious links. If you receive an unexpected text message, don’t click on a link. Even if it provides seemingly authentic tracking and delivery information.
  • DON’T respond to unsolicited texts. Immediately delete the message, and never respond. If you’re unsure about the message, look up and contact the company directly (don’t use the info in the text message).
  • DON’T pay additional money to get a package delivered. Know that legit companies won’t contact you “out of the blue” to request additional fees for shipping or delivery.
  • DO look for a missed delivery notice. Legitimate delivery services will usually leave a physical “missed delivery” notice on your front door or doorstep.
  • DO report fraud when you see it. If you think you’ve spotted a scam, contact the FTC at ReportFraud.ftc.gov, which helps law enforcement partners gain important information about scams.

Here’s how it works:

Someone contacts you asking for a donation to their charity. It sounds like a group you’ve heard of, it seems real, and you want to help.

How can you tell what charity is legitimate and what’s a scam? Scammers want your money quickly. Charity scammers often pressure you to donate right away. They might ask for cash, and might even offer to send a courier or ask you to wire money. Scammers often refuse to send you information about the charity, give you details, or tell you how the money will be used. They might even thank you for a pledge you don’t remember making.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Take your time. Tell callers to send you information by mail. For requests you get in the mail, do your research. Is it a real group? What percentage of your donation goes to the charity? Is your donation tax-deductible? How do they want you to pay? Rule out anyone who asks you to send cash or wire money. Chances are, that’s a scam.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. It’s likely that nearly everyone you know gets charity solicitations. This information could help someone else spot a scam.

Please report scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261 or go online at ftc.gov/complaint.

Your complaint can help protect other people. By filing a complaint, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify scammers and stop them before they can get someone’s hard earned money. It really makes a difference.

 

Amy Ensor, teacher at West Side Elementary, is the latest Northeast Community Credit Union Helping Teachers Teach grant winner.

Ensor applied for the grant to provide book bins in her classroom library for her Accelerated Reading program. In Accelerated Reader, students have individual book levels to read at and complete quizzes.

“With the book bins, I can arrange the books in a way that would help the students be able to check out books appropriate on their level of ability,” Ensor said. “The program helps children grow comprehension skills and reading levels. Most importantly, Accelerated Reading helps foster a greater love for reading.”

Northeast Community Credit Union awards $300 every month to a classroom to be utilized for classroom needs, classroom activities, and academic enrichment.  Helping Teachers Teach is open to teachers within Carter, Johnson, Unicoi, Sullivan and Washington counties who are members of Northeast Community Credit Union. Area teachers may become members online or at any NCCU location and can download the grant application on the credit union’s website:  www.BeMyCU.org.